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Stall Types Explained


In this section I am going to explain the difference between a slant stall, stall and a half, and a box stall. Before I get started, I want to disclose I am NOT a veterinarian, I am not making any recommendations, and this is my opinion.

Slant Stalls – These were created so people could put more horses on a shorter trailer. They are exactly as they sound. The horse stands facing the left side of the trailer at roughly a 45 degree angle. You can measure a slant stall two ways: 1) far corner to far corner – they will typically measure 120-132 inches long 2) down the center – they will typically measure 96-102 inches long. The second way is the correct way to measure the stall. This means most horses over 15.3 hands will not fit in a slant stall because the horse is standing nose to tail in the stall. The only way a slant stall can fit larger horses is to widen the stall or take out a divider. This will allow the horse to stand more front to back.

Single Stall – The horse is facing front to back or back to front. The horses stall is 31 inches wide (the trailer width divided by three) and 78-82 inches long. This stall is shorter but the horse is standing in the stall from chest to butt. There is an extra 36+ inches in front of the chest for the horse’s neck and head. The horse is cross tied to the side of each stall wall.

Stall and a half – The horse is facing front to back or back to front. The horses stall is 40 inches wide (the trailer width divided by two) and 78-82 inches long. This stall is shorter but the horse is standing in the stall from chest to butt. There is an extra 36+ inches in front of the chest for the horse’s neck and head. The horse is cross tied to the side of each stall wall.

Box Stall – This is the largest stall type. It is 80 inches wide (the width of the trailer) and 78-82 inches long. The horse is not cross tied in a box stall, the horse is free to walk around. This is the preferred way to ship a mare and foal.

Technology now allows horse shippers to watch a horse while they are transporting it. If you ship your horse in a box stall and it arrives sweaty or tired, ask the transporter if the horse was walking in circles. When speaking to transporters, they all tell me over half the horses they ship in a box stall walk in circles while it is being transported. 

By: www.equirideapp.com - Worlds Leading Mobile App Horse Transportation Company Connecting Owners, Trainers, & Drivers